Monthly Archives: October 2012

Forecasting the Debate

Some predictions for tonight’s foreign policy debate: Both candidates will probably spend a lot ot time competing to show us several things that are NOT relevant to our foreign policy: (1) Who can be tougher on our enemies (whether defined … Continue reading

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Slow week

It’s a slow week for blogging, as I am gearing up for travel to Russia and India in the next two weeks.  So I promise insights from the road to Moscow and Delhi. Meanwhile, as we move closer to the … Continue reading

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The EU: A Worthy Peace Prize Laureate?

Today: A guest blog on the Nobel Peace Prize from my colleague Desmond Dinan, the Jean Monnet Professor at George Mason University and a specialist on the European Union. The EU is ecstatic. The announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize … Continue reading

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US Policy in the Middle East — Can we be Realistic?

Has Obama’s Middle East policy failed?  The death of four Americans in Libya, the increasing power of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, chaos in Syria, and Iran’s continued commitment to nuclear enrichment has led some to argue that Obama has … Continue reading

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What’s wrong with this picture? — The Global Slump

The Great Recession began in the US in December 2007.  We are coming up on five years since things began to go slump in the night. And yet…   Where are the signs of recovery?  So far, except for a few … Continue reading

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Europe’s Crisis is Back

When the wise men who wanted a united Europe launched the unified currency, it was a move based more on hope than on facts.  The Euro was not based on solid foundations designed to weather a storm and protect its … Continue reading

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Obama’s good day with new job numbers

The magic 8% mark has been breached.  No longer can Republicans say that there has been four years of “over 8% unemployment.”  What’s more, the new job totals for both July and August were revised upwards substantially, and labor force participation went … Continue reading

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