Monthly Archives: February 2013

The future of the EU

Today, I post in its entirely a blog by Julian Lindley-French. I have sometimes had guest bloggers, but I don’t usually reprint entire blogs. But in this case, Julian says things better than I could! 25 February. Italy has gone … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Foot on the Gas, Foot on the Brake — why aren’t we getting anywhere?

I was in London this week. Like most capital cities, the business center still looks prosperous: foreign capital is still fueling wining and dining and consumption and construction. Yet in the country at large, austerity policies are fueling a recessionary … Continue reading

Posted in The Global Economy | Leave a comment

Oops, what happened to growth?

This blog has been reminding people that, despite the irrational exuberance of the stock markets, buoyed by corporations taking axes to their labor costs and faith in the Fed and ECB, underlying growth remains terribly weak. How weak was seen … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

God and the Pope

Can anyone doubt there is a God? — what are the odds that lighting would strike the Vatican hours after the announcement the Pope will resign? http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/lightning-strikes-vatican-day-pope-1704295 Is God happy or angry? Certainly it seems time for a change. The … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

The Shape of Jobs to Come…

From the point of view of an individual job seeker, the job market is vast and challenging. The main problem is to separate oneself from your competitors and find the job you desire. How many jobs are being created in … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Optimism or Fantasy?

The remarkable rise in the US stock market to five-year highs must make us ask — is this justified optimism? Or a fantasy? There are true grounds of optimism in some respects. The US housing market appears to be recovering. … Continue reading

Posted in The Global Economy | Leave a comment